Cthulhu and the White worldview

Moldbug famously (at least in some quarters) once wrote that Cthulhu only swims left.  Having myself recently re-read H. P. Lovecraft’s “The Call of Cthulhu,” I’ve been thinking about what Cthulhu means.

One interesting facet of Lovecraft’s story is how HBD-friendly it is; in fact, “The Call of Cthulhu” could be called “HBD literature,” if such a genre exists.  In the story, you find ancient gods (extraterrestrials), which are adamantly worshiped by non-whites, especially blacks, mulattoes, and mestizos.  These gods are primordial.   Whites, however, seem to have more difficult time intuiting these gods and when they do, they often die.  Professor George Gammell Angell, the Norwegian sailor, and the narrator (it’s implied) all die after coming into some form of contact with Cthulhu.  It reminds me of a passage from Nicholas Wade’s The Faith Instinct where someone states that Westerners (European-descended people) now seem psychologically incapable of the collective ecstasy of primitive religion.

Sam Francis writes:

Lovecraft’s stories are dramas of modernity in which the forces of tradition and order in society and in the universe are confronted by modernity itself—in the form of the shapeless beings known (ironically) as the “Old Ones.” In fact, they are the “New Ones.” …The conflicts in the stories are typically between some representative of traditional order (the New England old stock protagonist) on the one hand, and the “hordes” of Mongoloids, Levantines, Negroes, Caribbeans, and Asians that gibber and prance in worship of the Old Ones and invoke their dark, destructive, and invincible powers.

The irony of the Old Ones is that evidence of them is often in plain sight, but whites simply cannot see them, when when whites do, it’s often through reason (such as the professor and narrator) and not through spiritual intuition.  Most whites, however, will probably never see Cthulhu; they are incapable.

Cthulhu in this sense is like HBD.  It’s right there in front of your eyes, but most whites are incapable of seeing it.  Outbred Northwest Europeans project their own psychological worldview onto the world and non-whites – for whites, it’s all blank-slate deracinated universalism.  For whites, everyone is white. (And even some non-whites strive to be be white.)  Whites can’t hear Cthulhu.

One of the wisest things ever said about HBD was actually once said to be my a black man to the effect (paraphrase): “Whites are fighting other whites about HBD.  Deep down, most blacks probably know HBD is true, even though whites tell them it is not.”

So if Cthulhu only swims left, it’s because whites allow him to do so by unknowingly ignoring his very existence instead of harnasing his primordial power.  To acknowledge Cthulhu is the ultimate red pill.  Although Lovecraft had most whites die when coming into contact with Cthulhu, this is not true of HBD.  In this case, it’s probably a sine qua non for survival.  Maybe the rise of multi-racial states will hasten Cthulhu’s return.

Cthulhu

Cthulhu

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11 thoughts on “Cthulhu and the White worldview

  1. Pingback: Cthulhu and the White worldview | Reaction Times

  2. I’m not so sure they can’t see it, or intuitively feel it. Sure there is uncompromising social pressure… for now. But behind closed doors a lot acknowledge HBD, especially those who have been in close proximity to the more “diverse” members of the new multicultural, multiethnic states. Which feeds into your thinking that things might just start to change.

  3. To restate enemylimes, whites are not allowed to notice Cthulhu in public, or in any gathering of more than a few people. That doesn’t men they aren’t aware. They just are required to pretend ignorance. There is a real war on noticing, because whites are not supposed to ever be tribal, or to ever notice all the tribes that have invaded white civilization.

    Call it…the Cthulhu in the living room problem.

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  5. This is hilarious. HP Lovecraft is a well known racist who saw black people and other minorities as primitive and bestial.

  6. Or maybe lovecraft is just famously a racist? I mean the evil people in the town for call of Cthulhu are described as negro looking fish people.

    In one story a character has a car literally named “Nigger Man”

  7. Pingback: Inspired, Beautiful, Unknown – The Relationship of Astronomy and Literature (project for Ball State University ENG 104) | A Writer's Epic

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